2001

2004

ANCHORS AWEIGH

The year was 2001. The internet was still in relative infancy and most business was done via phone calls or in meeting rooms. There was an urgent need to drive change in our oceans, and it was long overdue. Between 1988 and 1991 nearly 100 seamen perished on large bulk carriers, mostly off the coast of Western Australia. The tragedies were avoidable, and we sought to deliver solutions after Australia’s House of Representatives ‘Ships of Shame’ enquiry.

100

SEAMEN PERISHED
BETWEEN 1988-1991

Ships needed a higher standard of vetting, and charterers wanted assurance that the vessels they engaged were safe for both their cargo and the crew. In our first year, with a staff of just four, led by Founding CEO Warwick Norman, we completed almost 1000 vets.

Three of those original employees would go on to stay with the company for more than 15 years. “This says something about building a great team who are passionate about the work they do and providing them with good working conditions: something that the maritime industry doesn’t always excel at,” Warwick Norman said in 2017.

This says something about building a great team who are passionate about the work they do and providing them with good working conditions: something that the maritime industry doesn’t always excel at.

Warwick Norman, Founding CEO

2001

MELBOURNE

Jimmy Leong
RightShip

Warwick Norman
RightShip

Sanjay Dhareshwar
RightShip

Jan Fransen
Green Award

Norman Alwyn
RightShip

RIGHTSHIP PTY LTD
1000
VETS
PER YEAR

2005

2008

ALL ABOARD, THE RIGHTSHIP CREW GROWS

By 2005, the need to expand the RightShip crew was evident. Shipping activities didn’t stop when the Melbourne team clocked off for the day, so we had to bolster our presence in additional regions. We pulled some late nights and took several international trips to secure our first big contract in Brazil, which meant it was time to open our Houston office. It was a modest beginning, with our manager, Eric, running operations from his houseboat.

By 2005, the need to expand the RightShip crew was evident. Shipping activities didn’t stop when the Melbourne team clocked off for the day, so we had to bolster our presence in additional regions. We pulled some late nights and took several international trips to secure our first big contract in Brazil, which meant it was time to open our Houston office. It was a modest beginning, with our manager, Eric, running operations from his houseboat.

In 2007, Warwick put in a call to London-based David Peel and charged him with the task of opening a UK office. David recalls his early approach as “do it yourself; everything is done on trust”. Indeed, flying solo in London required tenacity and creativity. Before there was an office, David would be out making new contacts in between “diving into internet cafes to dash off a couple of vets”.

Eventually, he secured an office in Lombard Street, which has origins dating back to medieval times. “Right opposite the front door was a blue plaque on the wall. It was the site of the original Lloyd’s coffee house, a meeting place for sailors, merchants and ship owners, which opened there in 1691 and would become the site for the Lloyd’s News (now Lloyd’s List) to begin publishing shipping announcements. A befitting location for RightShip to be placed.

To celebrate the opening of the London office, an inauguration party was held on the Wellington, an old warship docked on the Thames.

Before having a London office, I was diving into internet cafes to dash off a couple of vets.

David Peel, General Manager at RightShip

NEW
REGIONS

2005
HOUSTON

NEW
REGIONS

2007
LONDON

1400

100
MILLION

8
STAFF

VETS PER
YEAR IN 2006

DWT IN A
SINGLE MONTH

3 REGIONS

2009

2012

SETTING SAIL

In 2009 the team was sailing along, with vetting volumes increasing exponentially. In August of that year, the 100,000th vet was completed in our Ship Vetting Information System (SVIS), with five-star bulk carrier Mineral China nominated to carry iron ore from Brazil to China.

Today nearly half of RightShip’s vetting is made up of tankers and this space continues to rise as RightShip’s fastest growing sector with the increased exports of hydrocarbons. To service this market, the Houston office is home to a team of 12. Vetting superintendent Fred Cheney has been with RightShip for 11 years and says it’s a colourful team, made of people from all walks of life.

While our team worked hard, we also made a point of building a culture where people were kind, respectful and had fun, too. With many members of the team having worked as seafarers in the past, camaraderie came naturally.

Take Tony Honeybourne who joined the team in 2009 and remains with the business today. For many years he was Melbourne’s inaugural Fruit Man, journeying to the local market each Tuesday and collecting produce for his teammates. “I got to know these people at the fruit stand. They gave me all the fresh stuff. I put that down to my charming personality,” Tony laughs.

The small gesture highlights the way in which our team looks out for one another, and why they stay. “I’ve been with RightShip longer than I’ve been anywhere else. I work with great people with a lot of professional knowledge, and they’re a bit of fun. I feel valued,” he says.

I’ve been with RightShip longer than I’ve been anywhere else. I work with great people with a lot of professional knowledge, and they’re a bit of fun. I feel valued.

Tony Honeybourne, Senior Superintendent Dry Cargo Inspections

By 2012, RightShip had recognised the need to expand into sustainability. The GHG Rating was developed and in that year the product was a finalist in the 2012 Wall Street Journal Asian Innovation Awards. In the same year, we achieved 200,000 vets and celebrated with a $20,000 donation to the Sailors’ Society.

1000

2000

WALL STREET
JOURNAL ASIAN
INNOVATION
AWARDS

VETS PER
YEAR IN 2009

VETS PER
YEAR IN 2012

2013

2016

STEERING TOWARDS ZERO-EMISSIONS

We knew that setting standards in sustainability would be controversial, because at the time such practices were not widely used. But increasingly, charterers saw the need to select vessels offering a lower Co2 output and efficient fuel consumption. By 2013 the concept was starting to take hold, with our A-G rating scale delivering considerable influence. Soon, Cargill, Unipec UK and Huntsman had all applied a ‘no F and G vessels for charter’ policy, and the industry started to take notice.

Kris Fumberger, RightShip’s Global Sustainability Manager believes this market shift was inevitable, “We have always worked not only to achieve emissions reductions targets, but to beat the IMO goals of a 40 per cent reduction in emissions before 2030. We shouldn’t wait for an arbitrary deadline and we’re committed to leading the charge,” he says.

In 2016 we went on to develop our innovative Carbon Accounting Tool, in response to the industry’s ongoing need to account for its contribution to carbon emissions at all levels of the supply chain. Early adopters of the product included BHP and Incitec Pivot Ltd.

Since we opened our sustainability division, the uptake of our products and services has been extraordinary. It’s proof that those who don’t want to change will be left behind. “We’re fortunate to have a great deal of data that will play a part in delivering tangible solutions. With increased pressure from financiers, insurers and other parts of the industry, dramatic change must take place.”

We’re fortunate to have a great deal of data that will play a part in delivering tangible solutions. With increased pressure from financiers, insurers and other parts of the industry, dramatic change must take place.

Kris Fumberger, Head of Sustainability

3

GHG RATING
CUSTOMERS
IN 2013

IN 2016 LAUNCH OF OUR
INNOVATIVE CARBON
ACCOUNTING TOOL

IN 2016, SVIS IS
REPLACED WITH QI

2017

2020

NAVIGATING AN EVOLVING DIGITAL LANDSCAPE

RightShip was firmly established as a key safety and sustainability industry influencer by 2017. In March of that year, we joined the pioneering Sustainable Shipping Initiative (SSI), working with several global companies to overcome some of the industry’s biggest hurdles.

By January 2018, CEO Warwick Norman had been awarded an Order of Australia for his service to the maritime industry. After 17 years at the helm, he stepped down from his position as CEO, handing the reigns to Martin Crawford-Brunt.

Martin was charged with the task of taking our data capacity to the next level and developing a more comprehensive Platform and Safety Score, beyond that of Qi. In these years, our data team grew as we worked to create a sophisticated communication service that provided clear indications of best practice and paths to improvement.

Our team worked relentlessly over these years to build the best product possible and took on customer feedback to ensure it would serve the needs of our industry for years to come.

With the project completed and ready for launch in early 2021, Martin moved on and new CEO Steen Lund was appointed in December 2020. It had been a tumultuous year, with a pandemic demanding that we learn to work remotely, all while rolling out significant projects. David Peel worked with the Nautical Institute to drive the publication of the Guide to Bulk Carrier Operations, and we completed the first draft of the DryBMS.

We also launched the Maritime Emissions Portal, which has been designed to help ports manage and reduce their emissions. After a successful pilot program with the Pilbara Ports Authority, the team is now working with more ports around the world. As if all of that wasn’t enough, we, aside from managing the Asia Pacific Region, now host the global RightShip Product and Innovation Hub, our Strategy and Partnership activities and the commercial leadership team.

NEW
REGION

2020
SINGAPORE

IN 2018 WARWICK
NORMAN STEPS DOWN
AFTER 17 YEARS

70

80 STAFF

IN 2018 MARTIN
CRAWFORD-BRUNT
DRIVES NEW PLATFORM
AND SAFETY SCORE

IN 2020 MARITIME
EMISSIONS PORTAL
LAUNCHES

GHG RATING
CUSTOMERS
IN 2020

4 REGIONS

2021

AND BEYOND

Together, we can achieve great things in the next 20 years, and we certainly hope you’ll continue with us on the journey.